5 Things to Know About the ‘OMG’ Diet Craze

It's controversial, but does it work?

   

A diet book self-published under the pseudonym Venice A. Fulton has cooked up controversy.

Parents and nutritionists are concerned that the book, Six Weeks To OMG: Get Skinnier Than All Your Friends, will lead to a rise in eating disorders among teens. Its author, whose real name is Paul Khanna, says that his tips are based in science and really work.

Who’s right?

It’s too soon to tell, but there are some things that you should know about the new diet craze.

  1. Khanna is not a doctor: He’s a personal trainer with a sports science degree from the University of Bedfordshire.
  2. The author claims he’s not targeting teens: However, considering the book’s title sounds like it was written in the voice of Mattel‘s (NASDAQ:MAT) “Workout Barbie,” it’s logical that many parents think it’s geared toward a younger audience.
  3. The book is strictly a weight-loss guide: Khanna makes it clear that doesn’t want his readers to make permanent lifestyle changes. Instead, he encourages dieters to use his methods for 6 to 12 weeks. His goal is to help people shed pounds quickly to achieve short-term goals like fitting into a bikini.
  4. He doesn’t tell people to sit in ice-cold bath water: He does, however advise dieters to soak in a room-temperature bath each day. Which still sounds rather uncomfortable.
  5. Some experts support the science behind the diet, others regard it nutritional blasphemy: Knowing this before you get the book and adhere to its principles, consult your primary care physician. Only your doctor can tell you which weight-loss techniques are best for your body.

Article printed from InvestorPlace Media, http://investorplace.com/2012/07/5-things-to-know-about-the-omg-diet-craze/.

©2014 InvestorPlace Media, LLC

Comments are currently unavailable. Please check back soon.