How Long Will You Work in Retirement?

A comfortable retirement still involves savings and investment

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You may have heard the popular legend about Eskimo tribes sending the elderly off to die at sea. As the stories go, when grandpa and grandma could no longer hunt or earn their keep, the younger folks would put them on an iceberg and ship them off. Fewer mouths to feed gave the younger generations a better chance at survival. I shudder at the thought.

In the farming communities where my grandparents lived, the older folks contributed whatever they could. As a boy, I spent many an afternoon shucking lima beans and husking corn with my 90-year-old great-grandmother. The garden and livestock provided enough for her children and grandchildren to support her in her old age. Fortunately for her, the Midwestern mentality was a little less harsh than that of the Eskimos.

Retirement is not a foregone conclusion for everyone, which begs the question: What is retirement?

A Working Retirement Is the New Status Quo

Does retirement mean you don’t work? Not necessarily. One of my high school friends joined the navy at age 18 and retired with a nice benefits package at age 38. After that, he worked as a county sheriff for a couple of decades and received full retirement pay from that job as well. Many of my retired peers are still working; they just do something different than they did during their first careers. That includes your humble scribe. When I retired, I had no idea that, less than a decade later, I would spend the bulk of my free time typing away in front of a computer, sharing my experiences and investment guidance with people around the world.

The happiest retirees I know retired to do something they looked forward to and wanted more time for. I was not one of them. I loved what I did during my old career, but the hassles of international travel like racing to catch planes and living in hotel rooms were wearing me out. When I finally threw in the towel, I didn’t care if I ever got on another plane again. My wife Jo and I spent a few years driving around the country in a motor home, and then eventually we bought another home (not on wheels) and settled down.

At that point, I had retired from something I was beginning to hate, but I still needed to find something I enjoyed doing every day. Those folks who have a second career lined up when they retire seem to make the transition more easily. A second career may or may not bring in much income, but that is often secondary to enjoying the job. Jo and I have a friend who retired and became an artist. She is thrilled when one of her paintings sells, but even more thrilled that someone enjoyed her art enough to hang it in their home.

I feel the same way about Money Forever. It comes with financial rewards, but the real thrill comes from the nice emails I receive from readers around the globe. Knowing that I’ve helped folks who are in the same boat I am in makes my day. If you can do work you enjoy, something that’s both emotionally and financially rewarding, why would you ever quit?

Some People Will Never Retire

I of course realize that many older folks work for different reasons. Unfortunately, many have to work to put food on the table. In my first career, I often used Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs as a teaching tool. Maslow categorized humans’ physiological needs – food, clothing, shelter, etc. – as the first level of his hierarchy. Our caveman ancestors woke up hungry every morning and had to go hunt and gather food. When you are worried about feeding your family and your own stomach is growling, you can’t spend a lot of time sharing your artwork on the walls of your cave.

Squirrels store nuts to survive through the winter, but over time man has become the best animal at storing nuts, so to speak. We went from hunting and gathering food as we traveled from place to place, to clearing and irrigating land for agriculture, to curing food with salt to preserve it, and then on to canning and now freezing foods. No matter the method, man’s first goal has always been to survive today, tomorrow, and hopefully many tomorrows after that.


Article printed from InvestorPlace Media, http://investorplace.com/2013/08/how-long-will-you-work-when-you-should-be-retired-2/.

©2014 InvestorPlace Media, LLC

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