Solyndra: Where Did Your Tax Dollars Go?

Nov 2, 2011, 2:04 pm EST

I had dinner Tuesday night with a Silicon Valley CEO.  He mentioned that Solyndra, the bankrupt solar operator, was liquidating its assets via an auction.  “I want to get some cool chairs and a projector,” he told me.

Not long ago, Solyndra was a showcase for President Obama’s “green jobs” movement. Over the past few years, the company received $528 million in federal loan guarantees. Now, it’s just a sad, expensive joke.

On the other hand, if you want to get some good deals on so-called noncore assets, you can check out Heritage Global Partners, which is managing the auction (they also handled the one for Enron). Read 

Global Brass & Copper Buffing Up for an IPO

Nov 1, 2011, 1:26 pm EST
Global Brass & Copper Buffing Up for an IPO

When it comes to corporate turnarounds, John Walker is one of the best operators. Among his accomplishments: He was able to restructure Weirton Steel Corporation, as well as help Delphi Corporation get back to health.

His latest gig? CEO at Global Brass & Copper, a specialty manufacturer of foil, rods and fabricated components for markets like housing, autos and munitions. Since coming on board in 2007, it looks like this has been another success for Walker.

The most recent good news: Global Brass & Copper has filed for an IPO. The underwriters include Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS) and Morgan Stanley (NYSE:MS). Read 

Facebook CEO Says Risks Drove Success

Nov 1, 2011, 10:54 am EST

Facebook has turned into a big threat for Internet operators like Google (Nasdaq:GOOG), Microsoft (Nasdaq:MSFT) and Yahoo (Nasdaq:YHOO), and the company’s co-founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, gave some insight as to how Facebook forged its success during a recent free-wheeling interview at the Y Combinator Startup School event.  

When he started the social network six years ago, Zuckerberg didn’t think Facebook would become a company.  Instead, he just thought it was just an awesome idea – as well as an obsession.  As is now fairly well known, he dropped out of Harvard and moved into a house in Palo Alto, Calif., which become the headquarters of Facebook.

Zuckerberg realized that the Internet was undergoing a big move to social features — people wanted an easy way to connect with their friends and share things.  He saw it as an inevitable trend. Read 

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