7 Mid-Cap Dividend ETFs to Buy

Mid-cap dividend ETFs are ideal income generators for investors looking for added upside

By Todd Shriber, InvestorPlace Contributor

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It is often said that among the various market capitalization segments, mid-cap stocks are overlooked relative to their large- and small-cap peers. Generally, mid caps are defined as those companies with market capitalizations ranging from just over $2 billion to $10 billion.

Mid caps’ overlooked status holds true in the world of ETFs as well, particularly among dividend ETFs where the number of funds dedicated to mid-cap dividend payers is paltry compared to large- and small-cap dividend ETFs.

While the number of dedicated mid-cap dividend ETFs remains small, mid caps’ have, in recent years, been displaying solid dividend growth. Here are some of the best dividend names among mid-cap ETFs, including some value funds with favorable dividend traits.

WisdomTree U.S. MidCap Dividend Fund (DON)

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Expense ratio: 0.38% per year, or $38 on a $10,000 investment.

Among mid-cap dividend ETFs, the the WisdomTree U.S. MidCap Dividend Fund (NYSEARCA:DON) is the leader both in terms if heft and track record. The $3.30 billion DON has a track record spanning 12 and a half years.

DON tracks the WisdomTree U.S. MidCap Dividend Index, which is “dividend weighted annually to reflect the proportionate share of the aggregate cash dividends each component company is projected to pay in the coming year, based on the most recently declared dividend per share,” according to WisdomTree.

DON’s trailing 12-month yield is 2.31%, or more than 100 basis points more than the yield on the S&P MidCap 400 Index. DON is also outperforming the mid-cap benchmark, something this dividend ETF has established a habit of doing since coming to market.

DON also holds about 400 stocks, a combined 35.61% of which hail from the consumer discretionary and real estate sectors.

Invesco S&P MidCap Low Volatility ETF (XMLV)

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Expense ratio: 0.25% per year, or $25 on a $10,000 investment.

As its name implies, the Invesco S&P MidCap Low Volatility ETF (NYSEARCA:XMLV) is not a dedicated dividend ETF, but there are myriad examples of the low-volatility factor intersecting with dividend stocks.

XMLV targets the S&P MidCap 400 Low Volatility Index, which is comprised of the 80 members of the S&P MidCap 400 with the lowest trailing 12-month volatility. This dividend ETF has a trailing 12-month yield that is more than 60 basis points in excess of the mid-cap benchmark.

The average market value of XMLV’s 80 holdings is $5.83 billion and nearly half the fund’s holdings are classified as value stocks. Three sectors — real estate, utilities and financial services — combine for almost two-thirds of this dividend ETF’s roster.

Invesco S&P MidCap 400 Pure Value ETF (RFV)

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Expense ratio: 0.35% per year, or $35 on a $10,000 investment.

The Invesco S&P MidCap 400 Pure Value ETF (NYSEARCA:RFV) is play on deep value stocks residing in the S&P MidCap 400. This fund with modest — though still solid — dividend traits measures value “by the following risk factors: book value-to-price ratio, earnings-to-price ratio and sales-to-price ratio,” according to Invesco.

Like many large-cap value ETFs, RFV features large allocations to the financial services and energy sectors. Those are RFV’s largest and third-largest sector weights, respectively, combining for 35.63% of the fund’s weight.

RFV is lagging the S&P MidCap 400, but this dividend ETF is showing some signs of life after posting a November gain. With investors showing some signs of favoring value stocks, RFV could benefit in 2019.

ProShares S&P MidCap 400 Dividend Aristocrats ETF (REGL)

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Expense ratio: 0.40% per year, or $40 on a $10,000 investment.

The ProShares S&P MidCap 400 Dividend Aristocrats ETF (CBOE:REGL) is one of the newer entrants to the mid-cap dividend ETF fray. It is also one of the most credible.

REGL, which turns four years old in February, tracks the S&P MidCap 400 Dividend Aristocrats Index, a collection of mid-cap dividend payers that have boosted payouts for at least 15 consecutive years. In other words, this is a dividend ETF for investors looking to focus on dividend growth. Since inception, REGL has beaten the S&P MidCap 400 by 120 basis points, according to issuer data.

Home to 49 stocks with a weighted average market capitalization of $5.36 billion, REGL allocates almost 45% of its combined weight to financial services and utilities stocks. Up more than 4% year-to-date, REGL is also one 2018’s best-performing mid-cap ETFs.

SPDR Russell 1000 Yield Focus ETF (ONEY)

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Expense ratio: 0.20% per year, or $20 on $10,000 investment.

This dividend ETF is a not a dedicated mid-cap, but the average market capitalization of the SPDR Russell 1000 Yield Focus ETF’s (NYSEARCA:ONEY) 273 holdings is $14.59 billion, which is in mid-cap territory.

ONEY’s “focus on income potentially enables the collection of above average dividend payments to boost total returns and provide a diversified source of income,” according to State Street.

Of the dividend ETFs highlighted here to this point, ONEY easily has the highest dividend yield at 3.43%. ONEY generates that impressive yield without excessive exposure to rate-sensitive sectors. Utilities represent 13.30% of the fund’s weight, but this dividend ETF has no exposure to real estate or telecommunications stocks.

WisdomTree International MidCap Dividend Fund (DIM)

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Expense ratio: 0.58% per year, or $58 on a $10,000 investment.

With domestic mid-cap stocks traditionally overlooked, one can imagine the plight of international mid caps, particularly at a time when ex-U.S. markets are trailing the U.S. Such is life for the WisdomTree International MidCap Dividend Fund (NYSEARCA:DIM), but this dividend ETF is neither new nor small.

This dividend ETF has a track record spanning more than 12 years and $252.49 million in assets under management. DIM targets the WisdomTree International MidCap Dividend Index, which excludes U.S. and Canadian stocks.

As of November 30th, that index had a dividend yield of 3.92% and a price-to-earning ratio of 13.55, indicating a discount to U.S. stocks.

Twenty-three countries, all of which are developed markets, are represented in DIM with Japan and the U.K. combining for 42% of the dividend ETF’s geographic exposure.

iShares Russell Mid-Cap Value ETF (IWS)

Expense ratio: 0.25% per year, or $25 on a $10,000 investment.

This is not a dividend ETF, but the iShares Russell Mid-Cap Value ETF (NYSEARCA:IWS) does offer the benefits of mid caps with favorable value characteristics, which can help investors unearth some solid dividend ideas.

A broad swath of mid-cap names meet IWS’s value qualifications as the fund, which tracks the Russell MidCap Value Index, holds nearly 600 stocks. IWS has a trailing 12-month dividend yield of 2.33%, which is solid among mid-cap funds, including dividend ETFs.

Like many dividend ETFs, mid cap or otherwise, IWS is heavily allocated to financial and real estate stocks. Those sectors combine for almost 32% of the fund’s weight. IWS jumped 2.44% in November.

Todd Shriber does not own any of the aforementioned securities.


Article printed from InvestorPlace Media, https://investorplace.com/2018/12/7-mid-cap-dividend-etfs-to-buy/.

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